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RIMS to resume non-practicing allowance (NPA)

The governing body of the RajendraInstitute of Medical Sciences (RIMS) on Wednesday decided to resume non-practicing allowance (NPA), which was stopped since June last year, to the doctors working at the state-run hospital.

RIMS director Tulsi Mahto said some new departments like nephrology and gastroenterology should be set up separately for which the detailed project report (DPR) was to be sent to the health department with the details of the number of professors in the departments. "The governing body also recommended creating 320 posts to be set up for doctors in line with the Medical Council of India requirements in which the final call will be taken by the health department. All the development work going on the premises should be completed as soon as possible," he added.

Asked from when the NPA would be resumed, the director did not specify any time but merely said "as soon as possible".

The meeting was held amid protests by the RIMS-appointed doctors, RIMS teachers' association, the employees' organization and the contract nurses. The doctors were demanding implementation of the RIMS service rules as soon as possible. "It has been 10 years since the RIMS had been formed but the service rules have not been formed yet. If the rules are being framed, it will be easier for doctors to function in a proper manner," said Ashok Kumar Sharma, secretary, RIMS Employed Doctors and Teachers Association.

Secretary of the Jharkhand Medical Teachers' Association Prabhat Kumar said they had submitted their demands to the governor's adviser K Vijay Kumar and other officials in the health department. "We are demanding promotion benefits, dynamic assured career promotion (ACP) benefits like their counterparts in other states and we should be recognized as government employees so that we get the post-retirement benefits," said Kumar.

Karamchari Sangh president Ram Dhan Ram said some of their demands included extension of medical facilities to their family members, upgrading the workers to Grade III and filling up of many vacant posts. The contract nurses demanded that their salary be at par with permanent nurses.

Director Mahto said various demands put up by the doctors and the contract nurses would be looked into by the administration. source-timesofindia.indiatimes.com

RIMS doctors submitted their long-pending charter of demands to governor's adviser

Doctors working at the Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences ( RIMS), Ranchi have submitted their long-pending charter of demands to governor's adviser K Vijay Kumar hoping that the pleas will be heard during the President's Rule.

Prabhat Kumar, the secretary of the Jharkhand Medical Teachers' Association, said the doctors had often put forward their demands to former health minister Hemlal Murmu, principal secretary K Vidyasagar, but no action had been taken.

"Now, we hope that in the wake of the President's Rule things may turn in favour of us."

Elaborating on the demands, Kumar said, "We have only three issues. We have always demanded that we should be recognized as state government employees so that we too can enjoy the post-retirement benefits like pension and gratuity. We are also demanding that like other states we should also get dynamic assured career promotion (ACP) benefits. Jharkhand follows many things which happen in Bihar, but the dynamic ACP has not been followed in the state. Apart from these, we also want that we should be given timely promotions."

Kumar said they would hold a meeting on Tuesday to decide on their future strategy. On Wednesday there will be a general body meeting in the hospital in which all the departments will raise their demands. "We have also decided to put forward the demands once again and see what they (the authorities) have to say."

Adviser Vijay Kumar refused to say much on the issue. "I will discuss these demands with the health secretary and get the details from them first," he said. source-articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com


RIMS Hygiene a distant dream

RANCHI: Patients at Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences ( RIMS) are living in squalor with most of the critical wards lacking cleanliness and hygiene.

Bed sheets are not cleaned and many patients complain of unwashed sheets with blood stains on them. Patients and attendants are compelled to use the same bed sheet for days. When asked, a patient in the labour room, who was lying on a mattress on the floor as beds were not available, said her sheet was changed on Thursday yet it looked dirty and had blood stains on it.

The white bed sheets in some rooms have turned yellow. "They (ward boys) were also giving me a blanket but after seeing its condition, I refused to take it. It smelt awful and even had blood stains on it. As we have come here for treatment now we are helpless and have to make do with whatever is given to us," she said.

Washrooms near the emergency ward, the central laboratory and the 'sanjha chulha', or the common oven that is used by the patients' attendants, areas are badly in need of cleaning and sanitizing.

One of the attendants said the hospital does not provide extra bed sheets, and most of the time, it is said the sheets are in laundry.

"My husband was here for the past 18 days and was using the same bed sheet everyday. When I went to ask for a new one the nurse said clean bed sheets are with the washerwoman. At last I washed it on my own," she recalled.

Similar was the situation in the surgery ward.

The nurse, who is in charge of the labour room, said they change bed sheets frequently and the blood stains never go even if washed properly. Since the women here are not kept for long so when the patient comes they are given a new one and when they leave their bedsheet is changed. Similar argument was given by the nurses in charge of the surgery wing.

This apart, two male toilets were also found unclean and the obnoxious stench was could be felt from metres away. The floor of the toilet was wet, water logged and dirty. The toilet near the emergency ward was found locked.

A person coming out of the washroom had this to say, "It's very dirty as people don't use the flush. The stink is so bad that I had to hold my breath and go inside."

The drinking water area of 'sanjha chulha' isn't any better. It was found wet with water all over the floor. People throw left overs so the tap area has been blocked. The dustbins kept there were overflowing and dogs were seen roaming around the dustbins in search of food.

The medical superintendent, S K Chaudhary refused to accept the allegations. He said they have enough number of clean bed sheets and blankets in stock. As far as the toilet is concerned he said people from the adjacent bank use them so he can't comment. About the sanjha chulha area he said people are responsible for making it dirty but sweepers do clean the entire area in the morning. Source-articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Patients suffer as RIMS runs out of vital drugs

RANCHI: If you are planning to visit Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS) for treatment, chances are that you may have to return empty-handed from the medicine counter. Medicines for heart, eye or gynaecological ailments, among several others are hardly available in the stores. Patients are often told to procure it from outside stores.

The only medicines available here are the ones that one is likely to find in every household. These include paracetamol, dilona, cetrizene, etc. The patients, mostly coming from poor households, are forced to spend hefty amounts in purchasing medicines from private stores. A government hospital should ensure that medicines are available to patients free of cost, instead of making the situation worse for them.

A patient who was returned from the medicine counter said, "There were six to seven medicines for heart problems. I knew that medicines are hardly available here but I went in the hope that I may get it this time. But I was proved wrong. All that they had were medicines for mild fever, cough and running nose, which are available everywhere. I will now have to get these medicines from outside, which will cost me more than Rs 1000."

Another patient echoed similar sentiments. He said, "I came here in search of medicines for my eyes but not a single medicine is available here, not even eye drops."

Ajay Kumar Singh, former vice president, Indian Medical Association (IMA) said, "There are enough funds with RIMS which should be disbursed for medicines. People sitting at the counters have a callous attitude towards the patients seeking medicines." He added many politicians who are in need of medical help prefer going to other metro cities for treatment. "There should be a will to upgrade the medical system here so that nobody is forced to go outside and all the medical facilities are available here," said Singh.

S K Chaudhary, the medical superintendent at RIMS, cited the problem of fulfilling the formalities of tenders as the reason behind non-availability of medicines. "All the departments submit the list of required medicines after which the tender process starts. This happens once a year. At times, there are some companies which make only one kind of medicine, which is why they do not qualify for bidding. These are the problems we are facing owing to which medicines are not available in the counters," said Chaudhary. Source-articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com


RIMS runs out of vital drugs

If you are planning to visit Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS) for treatment, chances are that you may have to return empty-handed from the medicine counter.Medicines for heart, eye or gynaecological ailments, among several others are hardly available in the stores. Patients are often told to procure it from outside stores. 

The only medicines available here are the ones that one is likely to find in every household. These include paracetamol, dilona, cetrizene, etc. The patients, mostly coming from poor households, are forced to spend hefty amounts in purchasing medicines from private stores. A government hospital should ensure that medicines are available to patients free of cost, instead of making the situation worse for them. 

A patient who was returned from the medicine counter said, "There were six to seven medicines for heart problems. I knew that medicines are hardly available here but I went in the hope that I may get it this time. But I was proved wrong. All that they had were medicines for mild fever, cough and running nose, which are available everywhere. I will now have to get these medicines from outside, which will cost me more than Rs 1000." 

Another patient echoed similar sentiments. He said, "I came here in search of medicines for my eyes but not a single medicine is available here, not even eye drops." 

Ajay Kumar Singh, former vice president, Indian Medical Association (IMA) said, "There are enough funds with RIMS which should be disbursed for medicines. People sitting at the counters have a callous attitude towards the patients seeking medicines." He added many politicians who are in need of medical help prefer going to other metro cities for treatment. "There should be a will to upgrade the medical system here so that nobody is forced to go outside and all the medical facilities are available here," said Singh. 

S K Chaudhary, the medical superintendent at RIMS, cited the problem of fulfilling the formalities of tenders as the reason behind non-availability of medicines. "All the departments submit the list of required medicines after which the tender process starts. This happens once a year. At times, there are some companies which make only one kind of medicine, which is why they do not qualify for bidding. These are the problems we are facing owing to which medicines are not available in the counters," said Chaudhary. source-timesofindia.indiatimes.com

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